Royal Birth, Commoner Death

(See Saturday, April 28th update at bottom.)


I won’t write at length about this (it physically hurts, it truly, physically hurts me to think about this too much), but it’s too important to go without notice. It regards little Alfie Evans, a gravely ill 2 year old British boy, and the royals’ newborn son.

The same day a royal baby was born a commoner baby’s life support was withdrawn against the wishes of his parents. The  stories coming out of the last few days are absolutely soul-crushing: Alfie’s father has given his 2 year old son mouth-to-mouth when his lips turned blue from lack of oxygen. He wasn’t fed for nearly 2 full days. The doctors said they didn’t expect him to last 5 minutes off the ventilator, but 5 days later, he’s still going. (They finally allowed him to be fed. The state’s decided he’ll just suffocate himself to death, evidently.) The Vatican says they’ll take him. The hospital won’t let them remove him from the hospital. They won’t let the Vatican take him. They won’t even let them take him home to die.

There is nothing – NOTHING – more important than the ability to have the last & final word on the care of your own children. If ever there were a more clear example of why our ancestors fled England for freedom it’s this: there, you are a subject. Here, YOU ARE FREE. The STATE is not your child’s parent. YOU ARE YOUR CHILD’S PARENTS. It’s ASTONISHING that EVEN NEEDS TO BE SAID! To come between the most basic, primal, sacred space between a parent and child is monstrous.

This is what happens when you put your literal lives in the hands of the state. The state doesn’t give a sh*t about you. They care about the collective. And the collective cannot afford to care for this hopeless blob of defective flesh.

Do you understand? Do you understand what that means? YOUR CHILD ISN’T YOUR OWN.

Now I ask you: if one of the royal children were so afflicted, do you think they’d insist on pulling the plug and letting this child starve/asphyxiate to death?

Of course not. I can’t stand it. I cannot stand this. But I had to note it. It’s monstrously evil and I thank GOD we are in America and PRAY we never ever let Obamacare fully bloom. The damned thing’s tripled our monthly insurance rates as it is, and I know we’re not alone.

Bonus…

— UPDATE Saturday, April 28th: RIP little man.

From Comrade to Rocket-Man

(**UPDATE added below)

It’s hard to overstate the magnitude of what just happened on the Korean peninsula! And how fast!*

In 1989 I was 24 years old, had just moved to San Francisco, and had just gotten my first on-air job out there at KTID in San Rafael. I remember living in North Beach, just up the hill from the Trattoria Contadina, and marveling at the happiness of the East German people breaching the wall to greet West Germans on the other side.

I didn’t fully understand or appreciate it then, but I do now. I knew enough to know they’d lived in what I perceived to be a dark, cold, grey place, largely cement, and un-free, a relic of the old Soviet Union, also a dark, cold, grey place, largely cement and un-free. Being American, it didn’t require any esoteric knowledge to know freedom is better, and what they had in East Germany was not freedom, so obtaining it would, of course, be a joyous event!

I remember Tom Brokaw anchoring the coverage. I don’t remember a thing he said but I remember the young people, my age at the time, taking sledge hammers to the high, ugly wall, and pulling their new friends up to stand victoriously on top of it.

It took two and a half years from “tear down this wall” to the wall actually coming down. Reagan’s advisors were literally begging him to not say it in the limo on the way to the speech. They feared a “red line” (as it were) that, should it not happen, would make Reagan look weak. As we’ve learned from recent, bitter history, a President’s words mean something: you can’t put down a “red line” or a line in the sand unless you a prepared to back it up, or the Office is harmed, we’re ALL harmed as Americans. It weakens the presidency, and the country, quite apart from the man.

Reagan knew the Soviets were on fumes, he knew it was an enormous risk, but he’d basically spent them into oblivion. He did a more subtle version of Trump’s “my rocket is bigger than your rocket” by actually, well, building rockets! Where Trump said it, clumsily, audaciously, Reagan just went quietly about the business of making Gorbachev win the pissing contest – with Gorbachev spending everything he could beg, borrow or steal to have bigger, better, badder rockets than Reagan did – and it worked.

To borrow a phrase popular today, he “broke him.” But in Reagan’s day, when you “broke” someone, that meant you bankrupted him. And two and a half years later, the cold war, having lasted Reagan’s entire adult life, ended, not with a bullet, but a handshake.

It was an extra-ordinary moment. When people say “war is just diplomacy by other means” Reagan “diplomacy-d” Gorbachev into peace by making him buy weapons of war until he ran out of money. “Peace through strength” indeed.

And now we have “Rocket-Man,” the 3rd generation of the 68 year reign of the Kims, crossing into South Korea as the first North Korean leader to do so since the Korean war “ceased hostilities.”

This all just happened in the last 24 hours. I don’t know how it will end, but it damned sure skippy looks like a rock solid start. The BBC called it a “seismic” event.

I’m speechless. *Fingers-crossed.*

*”Fast” meaning from Kim Jong-Un shooting off rockets & threatening the nuke the world, to “Hey howdy! Let’s be friends!” Less than a year! You’d think there would be some period of peace, some looooooong transition away from three generations of that kind of thinking, but here we are.

**UPDATE: A few hours after I pub’d this blog post, I came across this video. Seemed worthwhile to add it.

3 Years Gone

It will be three years tomorrow since my mother passed. There’s not a day that goes by I don’t think of her. I miss her laugh so much. I miss looking at catalogues with her. I miss asking her advice on thorny issues, she had a great radar about people and what the right thing to do was, always. I miss calling her about recipes. I miss sharing news about the girls. I can’t tell you how many times my impulse has been to pick up the phone when something great’s happened with one of them and… I don’t. She’s not there.

I miss going out to lunch with her. The first few months after her death I couldn’t go to lunch alone without crying. I felt like such an idiot. For instance, I was coming down from a doctor’s appointment in Boston just a short time after she passed and I stopped at Chateau in Braintree to get take out for dinner for the family that night. So I sat in the bar to have a salad to wait for the order and I started crying. The tears just stung my eyes and I couldn’t stop it. It happened a handful of times after that too. I’d just look across at the empty seat and remember how many times she’d be there and it just tore me up. Same thing with clothes shopping. We’d stop by Nordstrom and just going through a rack and she’s say something awful or I’d say something awful and we’d start laughing and I’d remember us doing that and I stood there a couple of times like an idiot just crying. I didn’t make a spectacle of myself or anything. But I couldn’t stop it. The tears just stung my eyes and I felt gut-punched at the thought I’d never see her again and they just came. I haven’t been able to go to lunch or go through a rack of clothes for three years without thinking of her. At least I’m not crying like an idiot anymore.

It took me until summer of the year she died to finally take her name off my iPhone. I remember where & when I did it like I remember where I was on 9/11 for crying out loud. I was in the parking lot at Stop & Shop in Pembroke when I finally decided it was time. I sat there in my car crying my eyes out. It felt awful. Just… erasing her like that.

I just miss her. ❤💔❤

“The Red Hats are Coming! The Red Hats are Coming!”

“Jeff Flake is a fraud. Bob Corker is a fraud. …Only a progressive could say they’re going to quit the game – but not yet, later – and in-between trash-talk the ref! That’s what Flake & Corker are doing!” 

There’s no CRYING in BASEBALL!” That movie line has become part of our national vernacular because it’s funny and true and so widely applicable to any situation in which adults find themselves swinging & missing.

There’s been an awful lot of swinging & missing going on in our civic life of late. And it’s come with a heavy, damned near oppressive dose of sanctimony. Like a traffic-stopping blanket of fog, all commerce comes to a halt so you can watch this strange manifestation of nature envelope the ordinary, the mundane, and obscure it into something unseeable, unrecognizable.

Jeff Flake is a fraud. Bob Corker is a fraud. But to hear the garbage media tell it, they’re fcking Paul Revere, warning us “The Red Hats are coming! The Red Hats are coming!” What a NOXIOUS load of codswollup!

Jeff Flake & Bob Corker have both announced their intentions to not seek re-election then immediately went on to lament the leadership at the WH. Had these bastards done this when they were at risk of being called a racist, I might be impressed. My difficulties with Trump are well known. But I’ve come to appreciate the creative destruction he hath wrought. He’s ripping the scales off these bastards and they’re revealing themselves. Gleefully. Self-righteously. And they don’t even realize that they’re just confirming everything we’ve always known about them: THEY’RE PROGRESSIVE REPUBLICANS.

Only a progressive could say they’re going to quit the game – but not yet, later – and in-between trash-talk the ref! That’s what Flake & Corker are doing!

Conservative Review’s Daniel Horowitz column here – from August – is my primal scream. I can’t say it better. Please read it and know my political soul!


No, Jeff Flake, YOU are How We got Trump
August 02, 2017 by Daniel Horowitz via The Conservative Review

What do you call someone who lectures players on how to play ball but then grounds into a double play every time he’s up to bat? A Jeff Flake. Or maybe just a plain flake.

If Senator Jeff Flake would expend a fraction of the energy he spends on sanctimoniously promoting his work on giving a forceful vision for conservatism on the Senate floor, we would have a different party. Most ironic, if not for the disgusting posturing and vacuous vision of those like Flake, we wouldn’t have Trump as the leader of the Republican Party in the first place. Flake is the embodiment of the intellectually bankrupt party that gave rise to Trump. Flake is so worried now about the effect of Trump on the party he never had a vision for before. If he wants to know how we got here, he should look in the mirror.

This week, the GOP media machine has been promoting Jeff Flake’s new book, a smug and sanctimonious polemic about his concerns over the future of conservatism. Except it has nothing to do with the authentic concerns all of us have about the party — the party that has stood for nothing on social, fiscal, or national security issues while the left has marched on, more truculent than ever in its pursuit of cultural and economic Marxism.

Jeff Flake is the poster child for the frustrating dynamic many of us have been confronted with in the past two years — the false choice between the status-quo failed GOP establishment and Trump. For those who were seeking a true American revolution built upon the timeless principles laid out in the original “Conscience of a Conservative,” written by Barry Goldwater, the debate over Trump has been a distraction. Most traditional conservatives are neither for nor against Trump; we are for the same agenda we have always supported, always seeking innovative strategies and tactics to promote timeless ideas. This distraction has been allowed to consume Republican politics because the voters got fed up with people like Jeff Flake.

When Jeff Flake was originally confronted with his failure to abide by his term-limit promise, he joked, “ I lied … I don’t know what else to say.” At a later event, Flake explained that the term-limit movement was still alive when he took office and it was the thing to do. But, he said, he quickly realized that it would take longer to get things done and that limiting his time in office was a mistake.

This sounds similar to an excuse given by a recent pledge breaker, Markwayne Mullin, after he got promoted to a leadership position.

So what has Flake accomplished for us that was so worth breaking his term-limit pledge?

Flake fails his state

After spending too much time in Washington, rather than changing the Senate, Flake got changed by it. Rather than giving a vision for judicial reform, a workable immigration plan, a foreign policy that puts America first, or a health care system that functions like a healthy market, Flake served as a rudderless lord of his small fiefdom in the Senate, always operating within the policy universe set out by the Left. His only major accomplishment was joining the Gang of 8 open borders initiative, which was a colossal betrayal of his state and of the first responsibility of a public servant.

The first responsibility of an elected representative is to represent his constituents and his state. As of 2013, it was estimated that there were 630,700 illegal aliens residing in Arizona. That is a population of foreign invaders larger than the total population of any single colony at the time of our founding. Over 10 percent of the state’s public school population is composed of illegal alien children. When coupled with the fiscal strain of health care and incarceration, the total cost of illegal immigration is $2.4 billion a year. As a result, Arizona has become the drug capital of the country. Yet, instead of relentlessly advocating for the sovereignty of his state with at least as much gusto as the California senators advocate for sanctuary cities, Flake spent the lion’s share of his time putting the priorities of Mexico’s government ahead of the security and economy of his own state.

That issue alone encapsulates why so many people flocked to Trump in the primary and wouldn’t even hear some of the legitimate conservative concerns about the future president. The only alternative presented to them was people like Jeff Flake, who only assailed Trump from the Left. Voters figured, “Well, if he’s against Trump, I must be for him.”

Being a social liberal invariably leads to fiscal liberalism

From day one, even when he was a fiscal conservative in the House, Flake agreed with the Left on cultural issues. But as many of us have warned, when you operate exclusively within the universe of the Left on cultural issues, it’s only a matter of time before you throw fiscal issues overboard as well. Flake has proven the truth of that theory. He was an ardent opponent and saboteur of Cruz’s effort to defund Obamacare in 2013.

Ironically, Cruz was proven right in his premonition that failure to defund the law in its incipient stage would result in acquiescence to its expansion. Jeff Flake, and his utter silence on the issue, is living proof that Cruz was correct. While Cruz was doing everything possible to compromise with people like Flake to get some sort of repeal on the table, even to the point where many of us disagreed with him, Flake long ago gave up on that fight. Nor is he providing the sort of supply-side health care reform people like me have been championing in recent months. Nope, Flake is too busy selling books. And anyway, long ago he told us, “Obamacare is the law of the land.”

What about his work on the Energy Committee?

In 2009, Flake, along with Bob Inglis, became the first Republican lawmakers to introduce legislation imposing a carbon tax on producers and distributors of fossil fuels, which would lead to higher fossil fuel costs for consumers. The bill, co-sponsored by Democratic Rep. Dan Lipinski of Illinois, would have set a tax of $15 per ton of carbon dioxide produced in its first year in effect, with the tax rising to $100 per ton over three decades

Some fiscal conservative there!

What about Flake’s work on the Senate Judicial Committee? While people like Ted Cruz have been proposing judicial reform ideas, Flake sat idly by and rubber-stamped many of Obama’s liberal judges.

So what exactly does Flake feel passionate about, and why must I read his book to ascertain something that should be obvious from his six-year tenure in the Senate? This is true of some other senators who are busy selling books but have never gotten their fingernails dirty on a single major policy fight, as Cruz and Lee have. The rule of thumb is that if you haven’t shown us a vision when you are actually on the playing field, there is no reason you should be taken seriously when you’re shouting in the bleachers.

Recently, President Trump downplayed the role of Jeff Sessions in winning Trump the primary. In a future tweet he might want to upgrade the role Jeff Flake and his compatriots played in electing him. Without feckless Republicans, Trump would have never found an audience.

Many of us are concerned about Trump’s lack of a coherent vision for some conservative priorities. But even more disconcerting is that as much as he’s not a conservative, most Republican senators find a way to outflank him and “out-flake” him … to the Left. A party where a man like Trump has become the “right” flank is a party that will not last much longer.

Jeff Flake is why we have Donald Trump. The vacuum of leadership had to be filled at some point. Many of us caught in between are disappointed because we have always stood for bold ideas — ideas that have been overshadowed by the clown show — but the last person who has the right to complain about Trump is Flake.

Daniel Horowitz is a senior editor of Conservative Review. Follow him on Twitter @RMConservative.


## end ##

Trump, Comey, & What America Saw

VDH is one of my favorite writers. He’s not a casual read. Every word matters. He can pack more in a sentence more than most writers can in an entire paragraph. I’d call him a poet but he’s aim isn’t feeling or beauty, it’s water for a thirsty brain.

What follows is what matters since January 20th. Not the garbage the media has been feeding you. This. THIS is what matters. Had he included the unmasking scandal, this would be 100% comprehensive. As it is, it’s still a masterpiece.

Enjoy.


Beware of Narratives and Misinformation by Victor Davis Hanson
September 7, 2017 via National Review Online

Narratives surrounding the DNC hack & Antifa reveal media bias and government bureaucracy at their worst.

U.S. intelligence agencies said Russia was responsible for hacking Democratic National Committee e-mail accounts, leading to the publication of about 20,000 stolen e-mails on WikiLeaks.

But that finding was reportedly based largely on the DNC’s strange outsourcing of the investigation to a private cybersecurity firm. Rarely does the victim of a crime first hire a private investigator whose findings later form the basis of government conclusions.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is many things. But so far he has not been caught lying about the origin of the leaked documents that came into his hands. He has insisted for well over a year that the Russians did not provide him with the DNC e-mails.

When it was discovered that the e-mails had been compromised, then–DNC chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz weirdly refused to allow forensic detectives from the FBI to examine the DNC server to probe the evidence of the theft. Why did the FBI accept that refusal?

That strange behavior was not as bizarre as Wasserman Schultz’s later frenzied efforts to protect her information-technology specialist, Imran Awan, from Capitol Police and FBI investigations. Both agencies were hot on Awan’s trail for unlawfully transferring secure data from government computers, and also for bank and federal-procurement fraud.

So far, the story of the DNC hack is not fully known, but it may eventually be revealed that it involves other actors beyond just the Russians.

There is not much left to the media myth of James Comey as dutiful FBI director, unjustly fired by a partisan and vindictive President Donald Trump. A closer look suggests that Comey may have been the most politicized, duplicitous, and out-of-control FBI director since J. Edgar Hoover.

During the 2016 election, Comey, quite improperly, was put into the role of prosecutor, judge, and jury in the investigation of Hillary Clinton’s use of a private e-mail server while she was secretary of state. That proved a disaster. Comey has admitted under oath to deliberately leaking his own notes — which were likely government property — to the media to prompt the appointment of a special counsel. That ploy worked like clockwork, and by a strange coincidence it soon resulted in the selection of his friend, former FBI director Robert Mueller.

Comey earlier had assured the public that his investigation of Clinton had shown no prosecutable wrongdoing (a judgment that in normal times would not be the FBI’s to make). It has since been disclosed that Comey offered that conclusion before he had even interviewed Clinton.

That inversion suggests that Comey had assumed that whatever he found out about Clinton would not change the reality that the Obama administration would probably drop the inquiry anyway — so Comey made the necessary ethical adjustments.

Comey was also less than truthful when he testified that there had been no internal FBI communications concerning the infamous meeting between Clinton’s husband, former president Bill Clinton, and then–attorney general Loretta Lynch on an airport tarmac. In fact, there was a trail of FBI discussion about that supposedly secret rendezvous.

Before he fired Comey, Trump drafted a letter outlining the source of his anger. But it seemed to have little to do with the obstruction of justice.

Instead, Trump’s anguished letter complained about Comey’s private assurances that the president was not under FBI investigation, which were offered at about the same time a winking-and-nodding Comey would not confirm that reality to the press, thus leaving the apparently deliberate impression that a compromised president was in legal jeopardy.

There is also a media fantasy about the Antifa street protesters. Few have criticized their systematic use of violence. But when in history have youths running through the streets decked out in black with masks, clubs, and shields acted nonviolently?

Antifa rioters in Charlottesville were praised by progressives for violently confronting a few dozen creepy white supremacists, Klansmen, and neo-Nazis. The supremacists were pathetic losers without any public or political support for their odious views, and they were condemned by both political parties. Yet Antifa’s use of violence was compared perversely by some progressives to American soldiers storming the beaches on D-Day.

Later, Antifa thuggery in Boston and Berkeley against free speech and against conservative groups without ties to white supremacists confirmed that the movement was fascistic in nature.

It was recently disclosed that the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security had warned the Obama administration in 2016 that Antifa was a domestic terrorist organization that aimed to incite violence during street protests. That stark assessment and Antifa’s subsequent violence make the recent nonchalance of local police departments with regard to Antifa thuggery seem like an abject dereliction of duty.

Doubts about official narratives of the DNC leaks and the errant behavior of James Comey, and misinformation about the violent extremists of Antifa, illustrate media bias — not to mention entrenched government bureaucracies that are either incompetent, ethically compromised, or completely politicized.

##end##