What Not “Oppressing” Hath Wrought

REFUGEES:

Obama’s “leading from behind,” i.e., not “oppressing” other countries with our nasty-ass, white, colonial imperialism has had profound consequences – but not in a good way. The misery told in this chart is unimaginable.

Total 34.46M “persons of concern” were “displaced” at the end of 2008 (You can click the little tabs in the graphic). Refugees, basically. People who had to leave home, against their will, because staying meant death, either fast or slow.

By the end of 2015*? (Nearly) DOUBLED. 63.91M.

Perspective? 34.46M is roughly the total population of America’s top 20 biggest cities. (Via the U.S. Census, accurate as of 2015.)

top-20-cities-2015

CHANT IT WITH ME: “This is what colonialism looks like!”

 
Thank GOD they’re not “oppressed” anymore.

Heckuva job, Barry.

 

*The latest report available as of this writing.

Leaving the Nest. Letting Go.

3-cherubs-reading-a-bookMy youngest just got early acceptance to her top choice college for next fall. And an academic merit scholarship chopping 40% off the tuition! (Yeah, I’m bragging. Deal with it.) If she goes, she’ll be over 1000 miles away. I expect she will. There’s a chance she may go to a school 100 miles away, but I doubt it. So, when Coryne goes, she’ll be about 1100 miles away, about 5 hours south of my oldest, Leigh, who is 900 miles away!

How did I get here? How did this happen? How did I get to be 51, married to a guy who will be 60 (!) next spring, with a 20, 18, and 18 year old? I won’t say “it seems like only yesterday they were in diapers,” because, frankly, it doesn’t. Seems like a long time ago. But it does seem… sudden. I know those two things don’t go together but nothing about parenthood is what you expect or makes perfect sense so perhaps that’s appropriate.

Each of my 3 girls is absolutely unique. I remember looooooong before I ever met their father, that I thought of my children up on a cloud, sort of peering over, like the cherubs in the Sistine Chapel, chubby fingers lightly curled over the edge, waiting to alight into my arms. I never felt like they were entirely a surprise to me, rather that I had merely waited to “meet” them. That from a power far beyond our understanding, on a clock far beyond our imagining, they’d know the right time. It’s not a feeling of helplessness to fate, merely that we’re in it – this fate thing – and to just keep calm and trust it. That’s not to say we’re not captains of our own ships. I believe we are. But we can either sail into smooth waters or crash into the rocks. That we are ships at sea is the fate part. The captain part is mine.

That’s all for now. Just feeling a bit wistful.

Only His Hairdresser Knows For Sure

This is why the internet was invented. Right here. Not information disbursement. Not the betterment of humanity. Not for military purposes, which is why it was actually invented. No. It’s for side-by-side images like this that can unite the peoples of the world. In harmony. And beauty.

Hmm-hmm.😏

trump-bird-and-trump

Knowing as we do how the presidency ages you, we can only guess how he might handle it. To dye or not to dye? I mean… It looks like he already does (these Photoshop highlights notwithstanding). Donny’s vain. The presidency will not be kind to him. He may decline a second term just because it makes him look like sh*t. Then again, he thinks he looks fabulous right now.

Bonus? This Golden Pheasant was photographed at the Hangzhou Zoo in… ChYna.

If nothing else, watching the Trump years will be entertaining. It may be entertaining from the gulag, but it will be entertaining.

h/t Chinlingo

Orange is the New Black

red-eyes

“Meet the new boss. Same as the old boss.”

Glenn Greenwald, hard-core progressive gay American ex-pat in Brazil is a relentlessly consistent warrior against the Imperial Executive and the abuse and encroachments on your privacy. We disagree on things, but on these things, he’s 100% right. His article, presented in full below, describes what we are facing.

Obama set a terrible precedent. The Orange King is about to get his hands on the IRS, the NSA, and God knows how many weaponized agencies. And since Trump is neither Republican nor Democrat merely… Trump, no-one is safe.

Good luck, America.


November 11, 2016 The Washington Post
“Trump Will Have Vast Powers. He Can Thank Democrats for Them”
by Glenn Greenwald

Liberals are understandably panicked about what Donald Trump can carry out. “We have a president-elect with authoritarian tendencies assuming a presidency that has never been more powerful ,” Franklin Foer wrote this past week in Slate. Trump will command not only a massive nuclear arsenal and the most robust military in history, but also the ability to wage numerous wars in secret and without congressional authorization; a ubiquitous system of electronic surveillance that can reach most forms of human communication and activity; and countless methods for shielding himself from judicial accountability, congressional oversight and the rule of law — exactly what the Constitution was created to prevent. Trump assumes the presidency “at the peak of its imperial powers,” as Foer put it.

Sen. Barack Obama certainly saw it that way when he first ran for president in 2008. Limiting executive-power abuses and protecting civil liberties were central themes of his campaign. The former law professor repeatedly railed against the Bush-Cheney template of vesting the president with unchecked authorities in the name of fighting terrorism or achieving other policy objectives. “This administration also puts forward a false choice between the liberties we cherish and the security we provide,” he said in 2007. Listing an array of controversial Bush-Cheney policies, from warrantless domestic surveillance to due-process-free investigations and imprisonment, he vowed: “We will again set an example for the world that the law is not subject to the whims of stubborn rulers.”

Yet, beginning in his first month in office and continuing through today, Obama not only continued many of the most extreme executive-power policies he once condemned, but in many cases strengthened and extended them. His administration detained terrorism suspects without due process, proposed new frameworks to keep them locked up without trial, targeted thousands of individuals (including a U.S. citizen) for execution by drone, invoked secrecy doctrines to shield torture and eavesdropping programs from judicial review, and covertly expanded the nation’s mass electronic surveillance.

Blinded by the belief that Obama was too benevolent and benign to abuse his office, and drowning in partisan loyalties at the expense of political principles, Democrats consecrated this framework with their acquiescence and, often, their explicit approval. This is the unrestrained set of powers Trump will inherit. The president-elect frightens them, so they are now alarmed. But if they want to know whom to blame, they should look in the mirror.

Obama’s approach to executive power flipped so quickly and diametrically that’s it is impossible to say if he ever believed his campaign-era professions of restraint. As early as May 2009, Jack Goldsmith, a Justice Department official under George W. Bush, celebrated Obama’s abandonment of his promises to rein in these authorities, writing that “the new administration has copied most of the Bush program, has expanded some of it, and has narrowed only a bit.” He added that the “Obama practices will be much closer to late Bush practices than almost anyone expected in January 2009.”

By putting a prettier liberal face on these policies, and transforming them from a symbol of GOP radicalism into one of bipartisan security consensus, the president entrenched them as permanent fixtures of the American presidency. As Goldsmith put it, Obama’s actions were “designed to fortify the bulk of the Bush program for the long-run.”

Liberals vehemently denounced these abuses during the Bush presidency. From 2001 through 2008, Democrats called them the embodiment of tyranny, an existential threat to democracy, a menacing expression of right-wing radicalism. “America’s Constitution is in grave danger,” Al Gore warned in a widely praised 2006 speech on civil liberties. Bush had become “the central threat that the founders sought to nullify in the Constitution, an all-powerful executive, too reminiscent of the king from whom they had broken free.” In one 2007 poll, 57 percent of Democrats said they wanted the Guantanamo Bay prison camp to be closed.

But after Obama took office, many liberals often tolerated — and even praised — his aggressive assertions of executive authority. It is hard to overstate how complete the Democrats’ about-face on these questions was once their own leader controlled the levers of power. According to a 2012 Washington Post-ABC News poll, 53 percent of self-identified liberal Democrats and 67 percent of moderate or conservative ones now supported keeping Guantanamo Bay open. After just three years of the Obama presidency, liberals sanctioned a system that allowed the president to imprison people without any trial or an ounce of due process.

In fact, a new Democratic Party orthodoxy took hold under Obama: the right of a president to detain people, or even assassinate them, without charges or a whiff of judicial oversight. This included even American citizens. “We do not believe that [Anwar] al-Aulaqi’s U.S. citizenship imposes constitutional limitations that would preclude the contemplated lethal action” by the military or the CIA, a Justice Department memo proclaimed in 2010.

Democrats (who had bitterly complained in 2005 about mere eavesdropping without court approval) not only failed to contest this assassination program but ultimately expressed their support for it. “Fully 77 percent of liberal Democrats endorse the use of drones,” according to the write-up of that 2012 Post-ABC poll. Support drops “only somewhat when respondents are asked specifically about targeting American citizens living overseas, as was the case with Anwar al-Awlaki, the Yemeni American killed in September in a drone strike in northern Yemen.”

This same dynamic — Democrats endorsing vast expansions of executive powers — repeated itself time and again, both within the national security realm and outside it. Obama issued numerous signing statements purporting to nullify legal obligations, invoked radical secrecy privileges to avoid lawsuits, eroded long-standing Miranda rights for terrorism suspects, waged a war in Libya even after Congress voted against its authorization and pioneered novel means of using executive orders to circumvent congressional (i.e. democratic) approval in a wide array of domestic policy arenas.

And of course, Obama aggressively expanded the system of mass surveillance, including on U.S. soil, that had been secretly implemented by the National Security Agency after 9/11. Once Edward Snowden showed the world what had been created, many Democrats became the leaders in protecting this spying system from meaningful limits, reform or oversight. When, in the immediate aftermath of the Snowden revelations, a bipartisan coalition of House members headed by Reps. John Conyers (D-Mich.) and Justin Amash (R-Mich.) sought to impose serious limits on the NSA’s domestic spying, the White House turned to then-Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) to lead the successful effort to stop them.

Civil liberties advocates and proponents of limited executive authority tried everything they could think of to persuade and cajole Democrats to rediscover their concerns about these abuses and once again become allies in the battle to constrain government power. But those efforts were largely futile. Partisan loyalties easily subordinated any commitment to the principles that they had purported, in the Bush years, to support.

The problem such advocates encountered was the same one they’d faced during the Bush presidency when trying (and failing) to persuade putatively small-government conservatives to oppose these expansions of presidential power: namely, many people are perfectly content to have such authority vested in leaders they trust, and fear them only when a politician from the opposing party wields them.

As such, the tactic of last resort to induce Democrats and liberals to oppose such policies was to ask them to think about how, one day, these powers could be in the hands of someone other than a benevolent, kind-hearted, trustworthy progressive like Barack Obama. Instead, Democrats were urged, imagine that a right-wing authoritarian, or a lawless demagogue, or a petty, vindictive tyrant won the presidency and inherited the framework of unrestrained, unchecked powers that Republicans implemented and Democrats expanded.

That day has arrived. With Trump looming, there is much talk of uniting across ideological and partisan lines to impose meaningful limits on executive authority, and those efforts are justified. But, as progressives were repeatedly warned, a matrix of power that has been defended and legitimized for 15 years by both parties will be very difficult to uproot.

November 11, 2016 The Washington Post “Trump Will Have Vast Powers. He Can Thank Democrats for Them – Liberals liked executive authority as long as Obama wielded it. Now they’ve set a precedent.” by Glenn Greenwald “co-founder of The Intercept (which) led the NSA reporting that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for The Guardian (UK).”

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